Janis Iro Case

All Photos (4)

The 1940's Janis Iro Case "Suitcase Iron"

 

This has to be one of the most unique ideas in pressing iron manufacture history.  As long as you remembered your suitcase you would never forget to bring your travel iron, because the handle of the suitcase is actually a real electric iron!  No need to bring along a travel iron.  Unlatch the handle from the suitcase and voila, the iron removes ~ electric cord and all ~ and you're ready to press your outfit.  How do travelers today get along without one? The manufacturer hailed from Wisconsin.  These came in quite a variety of coverings, from tweeds, plaids, and striped fabrics to leather or leatherette, and in a variety of colors inside and out. Description by Larry & Carole Meeker.

Patent Image: Click once to enlarge. Click twice to zoom.

 

COMBINED SUITCASE AND FLATIRON

Andrew William Janosz, Manchester, N. H.

Application January 31, 1946, Serial No. 644,639

Patented Jan. 7, 1947 UNITED STATES PATENT

It has been common practice for a lady. traveler to put a small electric flat iron in her suitcase for use in pressing dresses, etc., during her stay at a hotel.v A flat iron, even when small, is heavy and diiiicult to pack in a suitcase so it will not shift its position and damage other articles in the suitcase when the latter is being carried or transported as baggage. If such a traveler forgets to put her travelling iron in her suitcase before leaving her permanent residence, she is inconvenienced during her trip. If she forgets to put the iron in her suitcase before leaving her hotel, the iron may be lost.

The present invention contemplates a suitcase constructed for carrying an electric flat iron during travel in such a manner that each of the above mentioned possible diiiiculties cannot occur. In accordance with the invention, a suitcase is provided with means whereby a fiat iron may be detachably mounted thereon so that the handle of the flat iron serves as the handle means for carrying the suitcase.

The invention will be more clearly understood from the following description in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, in which Fig. 1 is a side elevational View, partly in section, of an article embodying the invention;

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the same;

Fig. 3 is an end elevational view of the same;

Fig. 4 is a sectional side elevational View of one of the parts; and

Fig 5 is a view similar to Fig. 1 showing the fiat iron detached from its holding receptacle.

One embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing and comprises a suitcase having a body portion Ill and a cover portion II hinged together as indicated at I2. The body and cover portions I and II may be constructed in any conventional manner and may be composed of plywood having a decorative covering upon their inner and outer surfaces. The cover portion II may be held in its closed position by conventional locks 1.

The top wall I3 of the body portion I!) is provided with an opening I4 which is closed by a plate I5 secured to the inner surface of the top wall I3 by rivet I t. The plate i5 is provided near one end with inclined flanges Il' and I8 engaging the wall of the opening Ill. A lock 2li is secured to the plate I5 near its other end and also fits against the wall of the opening. The lock 2U is provided with the usual movable locking tongue I9. T hus, the flanges I1 and I8 provide a slipper toe to embrace the pointed toe end of a flat iron F and which cooperate with the plate I5 and the front wall of the lock 2Q to provide a recess or receptacle R, into which the flat iron F may t. When the flat iron is placed in the receptacle R, the tongue I9 of the lock 29 may engage a slot 2I in the flat iron, as shown in Fig. i, to prevent movement of the at iron relative to the wall of the suitcase and the handle H of the i'lat iron may serve as the handle means for carrying the suitcase.

When the parts are thus assembled, a substantial portion of the body of the flat iron is covered or embedded in the receptacle R and the assembled article presents a pleasing appearance. The flat iron does not occupy any space Within the suitcase and since it is an essential element of the suitcase, it must always accompany the traveler and cannot be forgotten when the traveler starts on a journey.

Means may be provided for assuring that the usual insulated conductor 25 having the plug 2S may not be forgotten by leaving it at the permanent residence or hotel of the traveler. For this purpose, a movable gate 2l may be provided which normally is positioned in front of the outer end of the locking tongue IS to prevent movement of the latter to its locking position. The gate 21 may be formed by the free end of a curved leaf spring 28 which projects outwardly through an opening 29 in the plate I5 and is secured at its other end to the inner surface of the plate I5 by a rivet 30. By inserting the plug 26 between the spring 28 and the plate I5, the former is moved so that the gate 21 is positioned out of the path of movement of the tongue I9 so that the latter may be moved to its locking position as shown in Fig. 1. -If desired, hooks 3l may be secured to the inner surface of the suitcase for holding the insulated conductor 25.

I claim:

l. A suitcase in which a wall is provided with a recess into which a at iron may t, said recess being formed with a slipper toe portion adapted to embrace a portion of the pointed toe end of said iron, and locking means adapted to engage the other end of the iron, said slipper toe portion and said locking means cooperating to prevent movement of the iron relative to said wall whereby the handle of said iron serves as the handle for carrying the suitcase.

2. A suitcase in which a wall is provided with an opening, a rigid plate secured to the inner surface of said wall and providing with said opening a recess into which a flat iron may t, said plate having means projecting into said opening forming a slipper toe portion adapted to embrace a portion of the pointed toe end of said iron to prevent its movement relative to said wall, and locking means adapted to engage the other end of the iron to prevent its movement relative to said Wall whereby the handle of said iron serves as the handle for carrying the suitcase.

3. A suitcase in which the handle for carrying the suitcase comprises means secured to a wall of the case adapted to provide a receptacle for detachably holding the body of a flat ironwherelcB7 the handle of the flat iron serves as the handle for carrying the suitcase, said receptacle comprising a flat member adapted to engage the bottom of the flat iron, and cooperating holding and locking means for preventing movement of the flat iron relative to said wall of the suitcase.

4. A suitcase in which a wall is provided with a recess into which a flat iron may nt, said recess being formed with a slipper toe portion adapted to embrace a |portion of the pointed toe end of said iron, locking means adapted to engage the other end of the iron, said slipper toe portion and said locking means cooperating to prevent movement of the iron relative to said Wall whereby the handle of said iron serves as the handle for carrying the suitcase, and movable means normally positioned to render said locking means inoperative and adapted to be moved to a position permitting operation of said locking means.

5. A suitcase in which the handle for carrying the suitcase comprises means secured to a wall of the case adapted to provide a receptacle for detachably holding the body of a flat iron whereby the handle of the fiat iron serves as the handle for carrying the suitcase, said receptacle comprising a flat member adapted to engage the bottom of the flat iron, cooperating holding and locking means for preventing movement of the flat iron relative tor said wall of the suitcase, and movable means normally-positioned to render said locking means inoperative and adapted to be moved to a position permitting operation of said locking means.

ANDREW WILLIAM JANOSZ

http://www.google.com/patents/US2413830